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Taking Care of our Waterways

Thursday, September 27th, 2018

On August 31 Save Popponesset Bay sponsored a presentation with Joan Muller, Education Coordinator from the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve.  The topic was water quality, looking at both the issues and solutions we can all be part of.

 

What we learned:

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Healthy Eelgrass is a nursery habit for sea life

In 1951 Waquoit Bay was a rich biosphere full of eelgrass, the habitat for much of the sea life we so enjoy here on Cape Cod. As housing development increased, there began to be a decline in water quality due to higher levels of nitrogen in the water from wastewater, fertilizers, and the burning of fossil fuels.  By 1994 there was almost no eelgrass left in Waquoit Bay.  The same is true in Popponesset Bay.

 

 

What is the issue:

As nitrogen levels increase in our water, they fuel the growth of phytoplankton and algae blooms, which shade out the important eel grass habitat and decrease the dissolved oxygen levels that underwater life needs to survive.  This also negatively impacts human health and closes fishery harvest areas. This has become a worldwide issue, most recently in the news as it has caused a wide spread kill-off of fish off the Naple’s area of Florida, leaving many unable to enjoy their backyards and beaches due to toxic air and water quality. Sadly, this is happening in all 50 states in the US, and worldwide.  It is seen in fresh water lakes and rivers, estuaries and oceans, and is starting to show up in drinking water sources.

It is time to take our blinders off and ALL become not only aware of the problem, but become part of the solution!

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What are the sources of nitrogen in our water?

 

Increased nitrogen comes from a number of sources, almost all due to human lifestyle.  The top five contributors are

  1. septic or waste water
  2. fertilizer
  3. deposits from the atmosphere due to fossil fuel burning
  4. run off from storm water which moves everything that has collected on our roadways and paved surfaces directly into the waterways
  5. animalwaste

 

What can you do to help?

 

  1. Support funding of diverse forms of wastewater treatment.
  2. Keep your septic working well by having it checked and pumped out periodically (most systems need pumping approximately every 3 years).
  3. Mow your lawn high, about 3”, creating deeper roots, preventing crab grass and increasing resistance to drought and disease.Rain_Garden_St_Fran1_800
  4. Leave the clipping on the lawn to return nutrients to your grass decreasing the need for other
    forms of fertilizer.
  5. Consider going organic, or only fertilize in the fall using slow release fertilizer, and only half of what is recommended.Sweep up any spillage so it does not wash away.
  6. If you can, do not fertilize right before a rain storm, as this will minimize run off.
  7. Pick up after your pet, so their waste does not get washed into the waterways or storm drains.
  8. Create a buffer to catch run off from your yard by creating a rain garden that will use nitrogen runoff. Here is a quick link for how to build your own rain garden.

Learn more:

One way to understand your effect on the community that you live in is to look at your nitrogen footprint.  Here is a great link to a quick survey that can help raise your awareness of some of the ways we live that contribute to the nitrogen production on our planet.

Here are some other groups committed to raising awareness and making changes to help keep our waterways clean:

Everything Matters

Surfriders

Oceana

Moving forward:

Save Popponesset Bay has created a Water Quality Committee that meets once per month, to continue to look at ways in which we can educate, model and implement programs that will support a healthy Popponessett Bay and adjacent waterways. If you would like more information or be part of this please contact Nancy Curran at nancy@yogaonbeach.com.  Support Save Popponesset Bay by volunteering and donating today.

Side note: Nancy will be on Mashpee TV’s ON DECK with Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve’s Jim Rassman to discuss this issue.  Stay tuned!

 

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Loving Potential

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

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I love a new year, with all of its fresh energy, expansive potential, and unlimited possibilities. This year feels especially sweet, as I sit on the cusp of feeling last year’s inner inertia and releases that are blossoming into changes, actions and adventures!  The newness seems to be extending out a supportive hand to me to reset my course, with no judgment, reestablish my direction fluidly and proclaim my intentions courageously.

 

Yoga has been such a gift to me in so many ways, and unlocking potential is one of the BIG ways!  As written in HOW YOGA WORKS, Yoga “bangs on my inner pipes”, helping me to dig deep and move things around in my body, mind and spirit.  It keeps me from getting stuck, as it was Yoga that helped me to become an observer of my mind’s thoughts, my heart’s feelings and my spirit’s alignment.

 

The power of observing ourselves is deeply rooted in the gifts of being neutral, rather than reactive to what is occurring in the moment. When I am able to simply observe my inner environment, feeling the inner reaction, hearing my mind, and seeing if my spirit is aligned to it all, I find I have far more options than when I react out of unconscious habits. A gap is created, that has a sense of stillness and calm, that tempers or awakens me.

 

The habits we are so often unconscious of, that tirelessly repeat themselves draining us of energy and creating much of our suffering, come to the surface during my yoga practice.  I see my mind wandering into past ruminating, or future worries and in just the simple act of SEEING it I have become present, and in that moment of clarity I can consciously make choices that elevate me.  I am free again to make a choice to feel something that renews me rather than depletes me.

 

HeartMath has helped me tremendously in the awakening from habits that deplete me and guides me daily in tools that uplift me. I live more connected to my heart, and use the easy tools to make the shifts that assist me in making changes on a moment to moment basis.  I’ll catch myself in habits that I recognize are pulling me down, and in that awareness, I breath, connect to my heart and choose a feeling that uplifts me.  It is a very powerful and blends with my yoga practice and daily life so simply.

 

In my daily yoga practice, I am reminded of the deep tenants of Yoga, especially to observe the habits bound by Avidyas – desire, aversion, fear and ego.  Am I desiring something?  Do I wish to avoid something? What am I afraid of?  Is my ego driving me beyond my spirit’s guidelines?  These are questions I ponder throughout the day, opening my eyes wider beyond the limits of my desires, or aversions, fears and egoism.

 

It is often said, “this is so hard” when referring to making changes or building the ability to observe ourselves and I get that.  For me it is also the voice of ego that is crying out in fear of losing out in some way.  At the same time, pausing in those moments I recognize how hard it is to stay the same, suffering in my own manifestations of unhappiness, suffering or self-defeating habits.  I then choose the path of change, as it relieves rather than continues the “this is so hard” path.  As the new pattern uplifts me, I am inspired and the “hard” becomes light and easy!

 

So here in the newness of 2018, may you be inspired. May we all rise above our current habits, and find a path of renewal. May you love your way into your potential.  In support of one another may the hard become easy.

 

Happy New Year, new you!

 

 

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Yoga Philosophy Explored on the Beach

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

Each morning when Don and I step out onto the beach to teach we find opportunities to live our yoga. Teaching in Nature gives us no room for expectations, only opportunities to be present, flow with what is happening and walk the path of acceptance. This season Cape Cod gave us so many opportunities to do all of that! This article is our Thanksgiving to our teachers!

 

IMG_3653THE TRACTOR –

Randomly the tractor joins us out on the beach. We hear it coming off in the distance on different days, at different times during class. The driver is doing his job in cleaning the beach before it is littered with people, chairs and beach toys galore. It rumbles down the beach, chugging and spewing, as it bumps along clattering with the sound of rocks tumbling.

 

Resist it or flow with it seems to be our options, and yoga teaches us to go with moments like this and find ways to work with what IS. We make space for its path, cue only when it is has moved further down the beach, and in doing so it seems the driver has recognized that we are working with him. Recently I noticed that he has shifted his routine staying at the far end of the beach until we are done with class rather than driving past us numerous times. I find great gratitude for this teaching of collaboration.

 

THE WEATHER –

When most of us think of Yoga on the Beach, the images are of a beautiful sunny day with a gentle breeze, the sound of the ocean’s chant of waves lapping the shore and the smell of the sea enthusing our practice. Many of our days out there are just like that, and then there are the challenging days of heat, threatening rain, chilly cold morning or humidity!

 

We have learned to adjust our teaching to the ever-changing nature of weather in “our studio”! I remember once being at Omega inside one of their beautiful classrooms and walking over to the thermostat to see if I could adjust it. It was unlocked with a small piece of paper taped underneath it with one word on it – ADJUST. I stood there for a moment as I realized how powerful that one word was and that I had a choice to adjust the thermostat on the wall or within myself. I chose the inner path, walked back to my place in class and continued on.

 

Don and I hold that lesson for our classroom, giving each student space to find their way to adjusting to the day. Face the sun, or keep your back to it. Stand by the water to cool down or IN IT! Wear layers for warmth or sun protection with the option of stripping down to your bikini.

 

We never know what the weather will be as it can shift even during class, and we amp it up for those days that start out chilly, or slow it down on the 3 H days of hazy, hot and humid.

THE FLIES –

This summer brought on an unusual amount of North winds that drive black flies onto the beach during class. What a challenge these small biters can be, and an opportunity to work with “what IS”!

 

One of the mornings was during Yin Yoga, which was a cooler morning then usual thank goodness, as the group did great in covering themselves with blankets to keep the flies off. It can be tough to find stillness while being bit, but it sure gave us the opportunity to practice finding inner peace over and over and over again!

 

Another morning we learned that you can run but you can’t hide with these persistent bugs. We started out on our mats, then moved to practice by the water (they followed us), then up on the deck (they found us again but in less numbers.) So we settled in and enjoyed using the props of chairs and wall to explore our practice. Guess who moved onto the beach while we were up on the deck? YUP, the tractor and what a perfect time to show up as we were already off the beach.

 

THE LESSONS –

Be Present

Be Open to what IS

Find your way to acceptance of what is happening and then while flowing with it, continue to walk the path of ease, joy and learning.

Create space for others to find their way.

Use resistance wisely

 

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Yoga’s Four Keys to Inner Peace

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

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Imagine yourself on an adventure. You are stalking through deep woods, entangled by branches and vines. You quickly pull out a tool that helps you cut yourself a clear path. Maybe it is a sharp quick blade that severs the teeming vines or a cane that slowly untangles the branches. This is the way of Yoga, tools that we learn to use to help untangle the mind’s thoughts that hold us in a path of unhappiness, confusion, or doubts. Yoga is that life adventure that helps us to not only discover inner peace but master it. Not everyone wants or cares about finding a way to inner peace but if inner peace sounds good to you, lets continue.

In the Yoga Sutras by Patanjali there are some clear guidelines on how we can find our way to peace within (Samadhi). There are four simple keys that fit four persistent locks that Patanjali shares with us in Yoga Sutra 1.33. “By cultivating attitudes of friendliness toward the happy, compassion for the unhappy, delight in the virtuous, and disregard toward the wicked, the mind-stuff retains its undisturbed calmness.” (translations Sri Swami Satchidandanda)

In all of its simplicity, like any other change, the application can be profoundly difficult. So let’s look at them individually and then how to put it all into practice.

The four keys are friendliness (maitri), compassion (karuna), delight (mudita), and disregard (upekshanam). These are the tools to carry with you, and with vigilance, you spend your day using them as each of the locks may present themselves in barring you from your mental state of peace within.

The four locks are happy (sukha), unhappy (dukha), virtuous (punya) and wicked (apunya). 24/7 we come across people and situations that can be defined as anyone of these locks. The mind will judge people or a situation in one of these four ways and then if we are not vigilant we can let our mind take us down a path of self manifested story, which we use to maintain a state of discontent. It is the usage of the four keys that will be your salvation in the maintenance of inner peace.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

Each of the keys is a way of being, which may also define your actions, which will bring forth a feeling of inner peace. It is that simple in concept.

  • Be friendly, feel inner peace.
  • Be compassionate, feel inner peace.
  • Be delighted, feel inner peace.
  • Be indifferent (disregard), feel inner peace

It is in how we use the keys with the locks that is powerfully important!

KEYS LOCKS
Friendliness happy
Compassion unhappy
Delight virtuous
Disregard wicked

 

  • When you come across others who are happy you initiate friendliness from within.
  • When you come across the unhappy activate compassion.
  • When you come across the virtuous find delight for them.
  • When you come across the wicked be indifferent.

In the Heart of Yoga Desikachar translates 1.33 in this way, “In daily life we see people around who are happier than we are, people who are less happy. Some may be doing praiseworthy things and others causing problems. Whatever may be our usual attitude toward such people and their actions, if we can be pleased with others who are happier than ourselves, compassionate toward those who are unhappy, joyful with those doing praiseworthy things, and remain undisturbed by the errors of others, our mind will be very tranquil.”

Ready to make the shift? Like any other change you make it will take 3 steps.

  1. Awareness
  2. Forgiveness
  3. Consistency

First begin to recognize when you are feeling out of sorts, disturbed and have a look at how you may NOT have been aware of the circumstances. Maybe you have come across someone who is happier than you are, and in that comparison you use it to feel less than friendly towards his or her happiness.

  1. Notice you feel “less than” and use it to wake up,
  2. Take the next step to forgive yourself for “forgetting your practice”
  3. Finally get back to a friendly feeling for their happiness.

Or you have a friend who is constantly unhappy, and you find yourself annoyed with them as their unhappiness tires your patience and puts a damper on your happiness.

  1. Recognize that your impatience is a reflection of a comparison that has you shutting down your heart’s inner peace.
  2. Give yourself a hug of forgiveness.
  3. Break open the compassion!

In the case of the virtuous, when you come across those who are doing a good deed and you are upset with them, use it as your wakeup to delighting in their actions. Notice how your inner peace shifts.

Finally you come across those whose actions you feel harmed by and slip into feeling victimized (that feeling can be strong, enticing but never peaceful.)

  1. Awaken by recognizing that you have fallen victim in your way of thinking/feeling
  2. Forgive yourself for being the disturber of your inner peace.
  3. Empower a sense of undisturbed peace again!

From that inner peace your actions will bear amazing healing within you, and bear fruit all around you. It is that powerful!

Using forgiveness will help you abstain from forms of unhappiness that many use in a self-abusiveness nature that can create tsunami waves of disturbance in our mental/emotional inner sanctum. Boy, does that disturb inner peace!

Our path then becomes recognizing the sacredness of inner peace, and our role as guardian of that inner sacristy. The divine within us is our way of upholding, caring for, and empowering the sacred known as inner peace.

Remember this only works when you implement and vigilantly practice! Find the lock you are in and use the key!

Posted in Articles, Inspirations from Class, Spirit, Yoga Philosophy | 2 Comments »

Resolve 2016 – Sankalpa

Friday, January 8th, 2016

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2016 is here and for many of you this new year has brought forth your dreams, New Year’s Resolutions or maybe an intention. Reflect for a moment on past New Year’s Resolutions. Some of them may have been fulfilled or changes made, while for other resolutions you may have had great intention yet somewhere along the way the will dissolved or the intention was distracted.

The yoga tradition includes a practice of resolve called Sankalpa. The meaning is to vow or commit to that which is our highest or true nature. It often is rooted in aspects that already exist, and we vow to uphold, express, live them.

It is important to understand the difference between what you may have been taught about New Year’s resolutions and Sankalpa. Let’s begin by looking at how many make up resolutions that are about doing something different, often reflected on what is lacking or too much in their life. The resolutions then reflect doing more or less of something. “I weigh too much and vow to lose the weight this year” or “I don’t exercise enough and I’m going to exercise 3x per week” are examples of resolutions that are viewed from a perspective of not enough or too much that bring us to an action or doing something different.

A Sankalpa begins from recognizing something powerful and deeply heartfelt. We already know that this exists in us and our vow is to become it in our live choices or way of being in the world. A Sankalpa becomes a mantra or affirmation of what IS that helps to keep it in our field of consciousness. “I vow to be compassionate.” “I feel compassion towards others.” “I am compassionate.” All of these would be ways to express one’s Sankalpa. Personally I find that present tense statements (rather than future tense) empower the Sankalpa.

The first step is to be still, listen to your heart’s desires and feel. Sankalpa is feeling derived rather than a thought process. For many of us steeped in action, running from here to there, you will need to slow down and find stillness and silence to listen to the heart. Feeling what is birthing within is that first step, then proclaiming it often during the course of your day will help nurture it into being.

Awakening it with your mantra or affirmation would be the next step. Remember to empower it with a present tense verb of being. An example would be to transform an affirmation like “I will be more patient” becomes “I am patient.” “I want more love in my life” would become “I am loving.” Then vow to speak it out loud or to yourself often, and do it daily. You might find it helpful to link it with an activity during the day like brushing your teeth, going in or out of your car, or at mealtimes. I find it even more powerful to link it to those thoughts or actions that are in opposition to that which I am vowing. For example thoughts of fear or judgment might be the perfect time to proclaim, “I am loving.”

Your yoga practice will also help you to settle inward, and hear your heart’s desire. As you transform through the practice of yoga you may feel an alignment to your heart’s desires, which creates a sense of ease in releasing those “ways” that no longer serve you. You may have already experienced the letting go of something in your life that seemed so easy and natural that you dismissed it in some way, as you are used to more difficulty in changes in your life. Enjoy the sweetness that comes with this form of change. Embracing that each of us has the potential to transform with ease can be a keystone to the practice of Sankalpa We are simply breathing life into those parts of us that already exist.

I wish you a most splendid New Year, and may your heart’s desires be realized as you create them through Sankalpa.

Posted in Articles, Inspirations from Class, Spirit, Yoga Philosophy | 3 Comments »

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